A Commanding Presence

All together, it took nine hours. Nine hours spent in the shuddering, claustrophobic hull of a WWI-era submarine. Cautiously travelling beneath an underwater minefield to then torpedo a battleship, only able to return to the safety of the open ocean via the same treacherous stretch of water. What type of person is capable of such […]

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Far Removed

Painting of a billabong with warm, rich tones of green and brown, sunlight streams brightly through impressions of trees.

Like the artist who painted it, A Dry Billabong, Gunnedah, NSW (1950) is caught between worlds. John Salvana’s (1873-1956) portrayal of gum trees baking in the sun is typical for its time, even somewhat passé. The artwork captures the Australian landscape in an Impressionist style, a manner which had originated in France in the 1870s […]

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Land of Mine

For many artists, creative practice whether written, painted, sculpted or otherwise,  is about exploring and explaining the human condition – the things that make us human including, birth, death, emotions and existence. It can ask big and broad or sweeping questions, about life, the universe, and our place in it. It can also explore more […]

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An Impact on the Scene

A traditionalist in painting style, and an artist who worked primarily in oils, Joshua Smith (1905-1995) was a finalist in the 1937 Archibald Prize for this portrait of his father, titled J.W.A Smith. Prior to the 1940s, the Australian art scene was dominated by conservative artists. Though Sydney boasted progressive creative circles and ideas traditional art […]

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