Bragging Rights

On Saturday the 15th of April 1905, the Sawers Shield finally found its home in Moonbi after six years of stiff competition. A yearly competition between the affiliated clubs of the Tamworth Cricket Union, it would only be awarded to the team that could win twice in succession or three times in all. Moonbi accomplished […]

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Guadalquivir, Guadalquivir, Guadalquivir

Published by Angus and Robertson, this ‘Australian Copy Book’ was the fifth in a series of eleven, all aimed at training the hands of young Australians in good penmanship. The ability to write quickly and neatly in a ‘fair hand’ was a valuable asset in the labour market for office and bank workers. Phrases like […]

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Cut and Paste

Ernest McIlveen (1898-1963) might have been around nine years of age when he demonstrated his prowess with scissors in his standard issue drawing book. Using coloured paper, Ernest diligently made thirteen kaleidoscopic designs, recording six of them in hand drawn graphs in the top left corner with pencil and ruler. He may have made them […]

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See the Music

Black and white photograpg of a large group of people standing in the street facing towards the camera. People of all ages wear cowboy hats and plaid.

In her photographs of Tamworth, Judith Ahern shows us the characters and camaraderie of its famous country music festival with unflinching honesty; capturing everything but the sound of the music itself. Ahern took her camera backstage, into the pubs, and out to the streets during the festivals of the late-1980s, when Tamworth was cementing its […]

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Two Branches Meet

Have you ever wondered what your ancestors from different branches of the family tree might say to one another – how they might get along ­– if they were to meet and have a cup of tea together? In Not a tourist (2017), Carol Macgregor imagines how her Aboriginal great-grandmother, Annie, and her Scottish grandmother, […]

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Smoky Rides Again

Comic books started to appear during the 1930s when the increasingly popular weekly newspaper strips were collected into booklets and resold. The Second World War saw a boom in the popularity of comic books along with the moral outrage against them. Due to the war, the Australian Government enacted the National Security Act of 1939. […]

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Blue Skies and Dusty Ground

After making a series of artworks in 2010 which captured the performance of a circus girl, Anna Culliton (1966-) was on the hunt for a new subject. It was during a visit to the Taralga Rodeo that inspiration struck the potter. A nineteen-year-old quarter-horse rider was about to perform when his name was announced: Clay […]

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Simply Electric

The American inventor Thomas Edison is claimed to have said that to invent ‘you need a good imagination and a pile of junk’. It would have been easy for excavators working in William Street, Brisbane, to see these tubes as junk and throw them away. But these tubes are of World Significance as some of […]

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A Fitting Outfit

This brilliant jacket certainly fits the story of its former owner the country musician Tex Morton (1916-1983), born in 1916 as Robert William Lane. Robert or ‘Bobby’ began busking at 14 before recording several albums in Wellington, New Zealand. These are believed to be the first country music recordings made outside of America. In the […]

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Darkness at Will

When lecturing on the advancements made in electric light technology to 1882, Rookes Crompton (1845-1940), the inventor and maker of the current indicator shown here, told his electrical engineering colleagues that with ‘more light’ darkness could be determined at will, rather than controlled by the cycle of night and day. From early childhood Crompton was […]

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